Getting pregnant after miscarriage

Miscarriage is the spontaneous loss of a pregnancy before the 20th week. About 10 to 20 percent of known pregnancies end in miscarriage. But the actual number is probably much higher because many miscarriages occur so early in pregnancy that a woman doesn't even know she's pregnant.

Most miscarriages occur before the 12th week of pregnancy.

Signs and symptoms of a miscarriage might include:

Vaginal spotting or bleeding
Pain or cramping in your abdomen or lower back
Fluid or tissue passing from your vagina
If you have passed fetal tissue from your vagina, place it in a clean container and bring it to your health care provider's office or the hospital for analysis.
Physical recovery from miscarriage in most cases will take only a few hours to a couple of days. In the meantime, call your health care provider if you experience heavy bleeding, fever or abdominal pain.

Expect your period to return within four to six weeks. You can start using any type of contraception immediately after a miscarriage. However, avoid having sex or putting anything in your vagina — such as a tampon — for two weeks after a miscarriage.

t's possible to become pregnant during the menstrual cycle immediately after a miscarriage. But if you and your partner decide to attempt another pregnancy, make sure you're physically and emotionally ready. Ask your health care provider for guidance about when you might try to conceive.

Keep in mind that miscarriage is usually a one-time occurrence. Most women who miscarry go on to have a healthy pregnancy after miscarriage. Less than 5 percent of women have two consecutive miscarriages, and only 1 percent have three or more consecutive miscarriages.

If you experience multiple miscarriages, generally more than three in a row, consider testing to identify any underlying causes — such as uterine abnormalities, coagulation problems or chromosomal abnormalities. In some cases your health care provider might suggest testing after two consecutive losses. If the cause of your miscarriages can't be identified, don't lose hope. About 60 to 70 percent of women with unexplained repeated miscarriages go on to have healthy pregnancies.

Moms Expertise
    I love this info and pray that I never have to experience it! But it's so good to know, and personally I think the 'emotionally ready' is one of the most important parts. If your heat/head isn't ready then do not try yet. Talk it out first and make sure BOTH parents are ready to try again. :)
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