Travel during pregnancy tips

Generally, commercial air travel during pregnancy is considered safe for women who have healthy pregnancies. Still, if you're pregnant, it's best to check with your health care provider before you fly.

Your health care provider might caution against air travel if your pregnancy is considered high risk or you're at risk of preterm labor. Similarly, your health care provider might restrict travel of any type after 36 weeks of pregnancy.

When you fly:

Check the airline's policy about air travel during pregnancy. Guidelines for pregnant women might vary by carrier and destination.
Choose your seat carefully. For the most space and comfort, consider requesting an aisle seat.
Buckle up. During the trip, fasten the lap belt under your abdomen.
Promote circulation. If possible, take occasional walks up and down the aisle. If you must remain seated, flex and extend your ankles often.
Drink plenty of fluids. Low humidity in the cabin can lead to dehydration.

Whether you are going by car, bus, or train, it is generally safe to travel while you are pregnant; however, there are some things to consider that could make your trip safer and more comfortable.

It is essential to buckle-up every time you ride in a car. Make sure that you use both the lap and shoulder belts for the best protection of you and your baby.
Keep the air bags turned on. The safety benefits of the air bag outweigh any potential risk to you and your baby.
Buses tend to have narrow aisles and small restrooms. This mode of transportation can be more challenging. The safest thing is to remain seated while the bus is moving. If you must use the restroom, make sure to hold on to the rail or seats to keep your balance.
Trains usually have more room to navigate and walk. The restrooms are usually small. It is essential to hold on to rails or seat backs while the train is moving.

Traveling by sea is generally safe for women while they are pregnant; the motion of the boat may accentuate any morning sickness or make you feel nauseous all over again. There are a few considerations to make your trip safer and more comfortable.

Check with the cruise line to ensure that there is a health care provider on board in case there are any complications.
Review the route and port-of-calls to identify if there is access to any medical facilities if needed.
Make sure any medications for seasickness are approved for women who are pregnant and that there is no risk to the developing baby.

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    05/09/14
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