Language Delays: When to worry

Language delay refers to when a child's speech is developing the right order, but is just progressing slower then normal. This is actually very common and effects about 10% of all toddlers. According to the University of Michigan Youth Development Department, toddlers speech should develop as seen below. If you child isn't meeting the minimum requirements I would ask your pediatrician to assess them.

12 months

Says 1-2 words; recognizes name; imitates familiar sounds; understands simple instructions

18 months

Uses 5-20 words, including names

Between 1 and 2 years

Says 2-word sentences; vocabulary is growing; waves goodbye; makes “sounds” of familiar animals; uses words (like “more”) to make wants known; understands “no”

Between 2 and 3 years

Identifies body parts; calls self “me” instead of name; combines nouns and verbs; has a 450 word vocabulary; uses short sentences; matches 3-4 colors, knows big and little; likes to hear same story repeated; forms some plurals

Between 3 and 4 years

Can tell a story; sentence length of 4-5 words; vocabulary of about 1000 words; knows last name, name of street, several nursery rhymes

Between 4 and 5 years

Sentence length of 4-5 words; uses past tense; vocabulary of about 1500 words; identifies colors, shapes; asks many questions like “why?” and “who?”

Between 5 and 6 years

Sentence length of 5-6 words; vocabulary of about 2000 words; can tell you what objects are made of; knows spatial relations (like “on top” and “far”); knows address; understands same and different; identifies a penny, nickel and dime; counts ten things; knows right and left hand; uses all types of sentences

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About Taylor
Current: Chanhassen, Minnesota
Birth: July 26
On since: Dec 18, 2013
I'm the proud mama of my daughter Avery, born on June 6, 2013. I'm 26 years old, I work from home as a graphic designer, I will be testing for my 5th degree black belt in Tae Kwon Do in 2015. My husband, Derek, and I have been happily married for 3 years.