Our Day At the Park

Saturday, we took our daughter to the park to play. Jaina, my step-daughter, is a nearly eleven year old with Down Syndrome. She is very friendly. She spotted a group of girls playing basketball, probably between the ages of 8-10. She politely asked the three girls if she could play too. They gave looks of disgust and turned their noses up at her. My little girl was heart-broken (and this still eats at me). Basketball is Jaina's favorite sport. I was across the way, feeding my son and didn't notice too much (because if I did, I would have talked to the parents about this). I came to find out, from my hubby, the parents were present and witnessed the whole event, yet did nothing!
I have a cousin with Williamsons disease (much like Downs), a mentally challenged and mentally-ill little sister, and my mother was born with only her right arm. I also have a niece who is mentally delayed as well as a nephew. I suppose we were used to it growing up so we never shunned those with disabilities and were very accepting to them. In fact, I feel more comfortable around those that are.
It has me thinking, what are we teaching our children these days? To avoid those who are different? Because one's mind is wired differently? Because one's skin color is darker or lighter? Because one uses wheels to get around or lacks a limb or two or more?

What are you teaching or will you teach your children?

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Melissa MiddletonPennington Gap, Virginia
    06/12/14
    Melissa Middleton
    I wasn't trying to accuse all moms, I am just still in shock there are some mothers out there who allow there children to behave that way. It's awful.
    1
    06/12/14
    Comment deleted
    06/12/14
    Melissa Middleton
    It is. :/
    1
      06/12/14
      Beth
      We are pretty fortunate to have really easy teaching opportunities right in our house. Because we are a bi-racial family (my husband is mexican) all three of our children have very different skin tones - Hayden is the darkest of the entire family, my husband included. My kids know that what you look like doesn't make you any different from each other. We haven't encountered any situations where they've noticed special needs children being different, but I'm sure it will eventually come up. If it does, I'll just explain that just like our family's skin color, every person is different and some people may look or talk or act differently but we treat them the same way and love them for who they are.
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        06/15/14
        Comment deleted
        06/15/14
        Melissa Middleton
        Aw, I would be proud, too. This makes me smile. He is such a sweetheart! :) You did a superb job at raising him, Debi.
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        About Melissa Middleton
        Current: Pennington Gap, Virginia
        Birth: April 13
        On Moms.com since: Mar 21, 2014
        Mother of an active son, a precious baby girl, & a diva step-daughter (who lives with us). I am an artist, baker, organic gardener, frugal liver, & a Christian--happily married to my best-friend. Blogger at www.chasingwildhorses.com